Tag Archives: Joseph Delli Gatti

Vegan Holiday

Vegan Holiday
Joseph Delli Gatti

Closer and closer
every day
to my pet turkey
and closer to the holidays.

I named him Willy
and I fed him corn.
It may sound silly,
but I feel so torn.

I used to play with Willy –
we had so much fun.
But now Dad wants to kill him;
so, I yell to Willy, “Run!”

Run, Willy, run! Go, go – get out of there!
Run, Willy, run! Go, go, go!
Run, Willy, run! Go, go – get out of there!
Run, Willy, run – look at Willy run!

I see my wicked mom
sharpening her knife.
A tear falls from my eye
’cause it’s the end of Willy’s life.

I’ve known him just one year.
He was my only friend.
Painful gobbling fills the air –
I hope it’s not the end!

My father dropped the axe
while my brother held its head.
My headless turkey ran around
and finally fell down dead

Run, Willy, run! Go, go – get out of there!
Run, Willy, run! Go, go, go!
Run, Willy, run! Go, go – get out of there!
Run, Willy, run – look at Willy run!

I looked down at my plate,
just after Dad’s prayer,
at my poor dead Willy
all cut up lying there.

I dumped my dinner plate
right there on the floor,
and yelled to Willy, “RUN!”
as I held open the door.

I started to cry
’cause Willy didn’t move.
My mom said, “Come back in here –
and eat your stupid food.”

Run, Willy, run! Go, go – get out of there!
Run, Willy, run! Go, go, go!
Run, Willy, run! Go, go – get out of there!
Run, Willy, run – look at Willy run!

And that’s why I’m a vegan!

The Plight Before Christmas

The Plight Before Christmas
Joseph Delli Gatti

T’was the night before Christmas, and there he sat –
a boy and his friend, an old alley cay.
There were holes in his stockings, and his clothes were rags.
He sat writing a Christmas list on an old paper bag.

He didn’t want much, just one little thing:
a beautiful present that only Santa could bring.
Then the boy hung his socks from an old garbage can
to be filled with goodies by the jolly red man.

He curled up in some newspaper right next to his kitten,
thinking of Christmas and the list he had written.
and there he slept on the cold city street
tired and dirty with nothing to eat.

He awoke the next morning and rubbed his eyes
for what he saw was a shocking surprise!

His socks had been stolen; no presents were near.
There was no sign of Santa nor his eight tiny reindeer.
The boy wept softly and held his kitten tight.
So, merry Christmas to all, and to all a good night.

Full-conversion Indian Chili

By Joseph Delli Gatti

“Full Conversion” food is a name given to a concept that I discovered during my year-long sojourn in Mauritius while serving a full-time mission for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.   I considered how close some traditional Mauritian-Indian food ingredients were to traditional Mexican or Central American food ingredients.

Some of my favorite things to eat in Mauritius were roti with beans, halim, curry-fried noodles, Indian-made Chinese rice, and chicken or lamb biryani (made both Indian style and Muslim/Middle Eastern style).  It was probably the best food in the world.

Much like the Mauritian creole language resulted from various nationalities sharing a language while trying to maintain segregated religion and cultures, the food tended to follow the same approach.  What would African/creole or Chinese people have for dinner if they only had access to Indian and middle-eastern cooks and ingredients?

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Online Study Course (10 hrs): LDS American History

By Joseph Delli Gatti –

How would you like to take my 10-hour non-accredited, diploma-less online study course in LDS American History? Here it is.  I promise that at minimum, you’ll learn something new.

I’m often confronted about my political and religious beliefs and about my views on various aspects of the LDS (Mormon) church. At one online discussion forum, I found that I had written over 1,200 comments on my beliefs (totaling nearly as many pages when cut and pasted into a MS Word document). And people still weren’t done asking questions or challenging me – although a lot of their questions were sort of cyclical or rhetorical in nature.

As I’ve thought about similar experiences I’ve had since that time, I’m reminded not only that I could have probably written a few thick books instead, but also that a lot of people – even really well educated people – don’t consider context and perspective as well as they should, nor do they think beyond the immediate or near-term results of their political or religious positions. And I know that it’s impossible in many instances to have all the facts, but a lot of people don’t even try to come up with simple logical reasoning or a complete functioning paradigm – even just a simple one – for their viewpoint.

It’s in thought of those things that I’ve compiled these Web links to 8-10 hours of videos and reading that present an awesome view of our nation’s origins. Of course it doesn’t contain every variable and facet of our country or of the LDS faith, but I feel that it at least paints a simple complete picture of our nation’s origins and also provides some great insights to the Prophet Joseph Smith, and to the circumstances and environment in which the Church of Jesus-Christ of Latter-day Saints emerged.

These videos and resources have been helpful to me, and I hope they can be helpful to someone else too. I went to some effort to put these in the best order possible so that they build on the understanding of each other.  The early pilgrims came to North America largely for religious freedom and for economical opportunities.  This series of videos begins with the origins of these pilgrims, continues with the Mormon pioneers being persecuted for their religious practices, and concludes with resources about the importance of religious freedom to Americans and to people all over the world.

If you complete the study course, please also post a comment below letting us all know how it went.

 

Why Condoleezza Rice For VP is Just Fine For Evangelicals

By Joseph Delli Gatti –
July 17, 2012

If you do a google search for Condi Rice, you’ll find a lot of buzz surrounding the name that has become one of Mitt Romney’s most likely VP picks. Several recent online news reports claim that Condi Rice would lose Mitt Romney the evangelical vote. Condi Rice would likely increase the religious vote. Here’s why:

Barack Obama and Joe Biden both support homosexual marriage and a woman’s right to choose an abortion for any reason. Barack Obama has ultimately declared war on freedom of religion through his healthcare mandates.  When faced with the alternatives, Condi Rice is an absolute saint. Continue reading

Science -vs- Faith and Works

In science, we are made aware of potential realities through discovery; studying; experimenting, testing, and observing; checking and interpreting results; drawing conclusions; and sharing the discoveries with others.
Add God to that process, and you have faith.  The scientific method is essentially the secular version of faith.
Discovery: I may have a spiritual principle brought to my attention – usually in the form of directions from my church leaders or through my own observations.  I formulate a theory about my observations.
Study: As I am made aware of a potential new truth, I can study the topic in my scriptures, find out what past and present church leaders have said on that topic, and can listen to the testimonies of other people.  I can ask questions in Sunday school or can bring up the topic with friends.  I begin to compile methods for testing my spiritual principle.
Experimenting, Testing, and Observing: This portion of the process is where faith truly is brought to life.  In the Book of Mormon (Alma ch. 32, v.28), an ancient-American prophet explains this concept.  I can view the effects of the principle in the lives of others, and I can act on the principles myself and observe my own results.  Sometimes, I even write about my experiences in my personal journal.
Checking and Interpreting Results: If I’m trying to learn about a principle like the Word of Wisdom, I can check my results from observing the principle, compare my before-and-after results, and can note outside influences that could affect my results (like having type-1 diabetes, for example).  I take my results and compare them with the results that I was told that I could expect from following that principle.
Drawing Conclusions: I often take my thoughts, my data, and my results to the Lord.  Sometimes I fast during this process; I nearly always pray and ask my Heavenly Father if I’m right; and, when I get confirmation from multiple sources (like my bishop, the scriptures, my actions and the actions that I observed of others, the prophets, and the Spirit), then I conclude that it must be a true principle.
Sharing Discoveries With Others: In LDS language, when we share our conclusions or knowledge about spiritual principles, we call this bearing testimony.  Once per month in church (in a meeting that we call Fast and Testimony meeting), we get to learn about spiritual truths that others have discovered or concluded to be true.  Many times, we can know that something is truth when people bear their testimonies, and those testimonies are confirmed by the Holy Ghost.
Through faith and works, I have come to know that God truly does exist, that Jehovah and Lucifer are His diametrically opposed sons, that the Word of Wisdom is true, that the Law of Chastity is true, that keeping the Sabbath day holy truly is a commandment of God, that fasting is a true and helpful principle, that tithing is important and a correct principle, that “The Family: a Proclamation to The World” was a document inspired of God.  I found that Joseph Smith truly did see God the Father and Jesus Christ in a vision, that he truly did reestablish Christ’s true church on the earth, and that I belong to that church.
When I was still a teenager, I was told that every worthy young man should serve a mission.  It always flew in one ear and out the other… until one day, for some reason, it stuck in my mind.  At that moment, my ears magically opened, and I heard and understood a new commandment.
I spoke with my bishop, spoke with some other people who had served missions, and prayed about it.  My girlfriend also noted how important it was to her to marry a man who had served a mission for the church.  I wanted to fulfill her expectations, be obedient to the commandment that I had been given, and felt that I had been blessed by God and that I owed Him one.  I also thought that God loved me with or without me serving a mission, that I could sweet talk my girlfriend into marrying me anyways, and that maybe the mission requirement and associated/promised blessings weren’t for me.  Was this a commandment that I needed to follow?
Well, I decided to go ahead and put it to the test.  I made it a goal to serve a mission and started preparing for it.

From the sparks of thought that initially touch our minds and imaginations to the completed scholarly articles containing mind-boggling theories in the scientific journals, the process of discovery can benefit everyone: regardless of field of scientific study or a religious affiliation. Seekers of truth research, experiment and test, observe, check and interpret results, then draw conclusions, and share the resulting discoveries with others. Continue reading

The Facade of California’s LGBT Movement

On Flickr.com, I saw a picture of a person holding up a sign that claimed that Mormons (the LDS faith) represented 2 percent of California’s population, but constituted 70 percent of donations to the Prop 8 campaign.  It surprised me that 2 percent of California’s population appears to be so wealthy in proportion to the anti-Prop 8 campaigners, so I did some math.

If this claim were correct, every Mormon man, woman, and child would have to donate $41.76 each on average.  Large stereotypical Mormon families with an average of five children each would be donating an average of $292.33 per family.  These numbers are if every single Mormon family donated.  This would constitute amazing participation – 100 percent participation! Continue reading

What is Marriage?

By Joseph Delli Gatti

According to the OS X.5 built-in dictionary, marriage is “the formal union of a man and woman, typically recognized by law, by which they become husband and wife.”  Another definition to this entry is as follows: “a similar long-term relationship between partners of the same sex.”  This second definition is truly the topic of debate and of a lot of questions in recent years.

Well, let’s turn to an even broader definition of what marriage is (according to the Mac Dictionary): “figurative a combination or mixture of two or more elements”  This is probably closer than both earlier definitions in accuracy.

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The Idiot’s Guide To Getting Involved In Politics

By Joseph Delli Gatti

Until I was 28, I had no idea about how politics worked, how to get involved, or even how to vote.  I had political opinions, but none that actually found a place beyond the expression of my lips. Talking politics does very little unless it’s in the proper setting.  2004 was the year that George W. Bush was reelected as the US president and that John Huntsman Jr. was elected as Utah’s governor.

My first experience with politics was in 2004, when a friend of mine approached me and offered me tickets to a grass roots event at Utah Valley State College (now UVU). Several people announced their intention to run for political office. While the event was very local, it was attended by a few thousand people – including top members of Utah government. Continue reading